Category Archives: Admission to Ranked Universities

Practice Gmat with Gmat Sample Questions

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Practice GMAT is the first advice an expert in US top universities will give you! The chances of doing well in GMAT increase only when you practice GMAT over and over again. It is not enough to practice GMAT a week or two weeks before you give the GMAT. Instead practice GMAT as a way to learn how to take the GMAT. This is a very different approach, but one that will guarantee your success.

Practice Gmat Test Tips

This article will give you GMAT test Tips but not the actual practice GMAT. Here is a great resource that can help you with many GMAT questions, practice GMAT links and a service that connects students with the best universities in the USA . Here is the best part, because this website is only a few months old these services are free right now. They have already helped thousands of students and can help you too. Go to this link and when you arrive on the site click the green “Register” button in the upper right corner of the page. Do this today because I don’t know how much longer they will continue to do this service at no charge. Click here: Practice GMAT

 

Ok let’s get back to our article. Many students study for the GMAT and take a few practice GMAT tests to see how they did on different sections. We recommend that you start with a practice GMAT test. Don’t worry about your poor scores. Take your time to answer each question. Don’t be in a rush and don’t be discouraged if you don’t know the answers to most questions. The key is to become familiar with the GMAT. The most useful practice GMAT tests are designed to help you understand your weak areas (remember your strengths won’t hurt you!)

It is important to practise (this is not a spelling error! In some parts of the world, practice is spelt as practice) GMAT because it is an adaptive test. What does this mean? This means that the test questions are automatically adjusted to your ability. If you answer the easy questions, the test will become a little harder. If you answer those correctly, slightly more challenging questions are presented. Of course, your scores increase as you answer more and more tough questions. You cannot skip a question in GMAT. So your practice GMAT sessions force you to make an educated guess!

GMAT scores are usually between 200 to 800. When you first start to practice GMAT, your scores may be low. Do not be discouraged. Practice tests have both easy and difficult questions. GMAT scores are not a simple addition of what you got right. Instead, it is based on the number of questions you answered correctly but also the level of difficulty of the questions, along with certain other criteria that GMAT uses. By practicing both easy and tough GMAT questions, you will be better prepared for the test. GMAT prep takes time and effort, but is well worth it.

Students often pay a lot of money to prepare for GMAT tests. While a tutor or a coach may help you address your weak areas, the proven approach to doing well on the GMAT is to practice GMAT! Practice GMAT over and over again! The more you practice GMAT, the better prepared you will be! go to Practice Gmat for more information

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Admission to Biomedical engineering in the US

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Biomedical engineering is a rapidly growing field in the US and international students are interested in this program. It is an interdisciplinary field that overlaps engineering and medicine.  It includes theory in traditional engineering along with topics in biology including instrumentation, biosensors, biomaterials, biomechanics, and biomedical imaging. This is a tough program and getting admission requires a decent GRE score, a good GPA, and a good TOEFL or IELTS score. Most universities that offer this program require the GRE.  

While different universities have different criteria, most good universities will require calculus including differential equations, physics, circuits, a computer programming course (C++) and biology, chemistry,  and organic chemistry. Here is another good article about Biomedical Engineering Schools

“College” is not bad

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So many international students assume that if it is a "college" it cannot be as good as a university. Wrong. Look for colleges like Harvey Mudd that focus on global experiences. Your employers will love you!
 
Harvey Mudd College: Global Clinic Program

Recognizing that the world is becoming increasingly "flat," HMC’s Department of Engineering began the Global Clinic Program in 2005 to prepare students for the future challenges of functioning as innovative engineers and scientists in a global context. Built upon HMC’s internationally recognized Clinic Program, the Global Clinic plans to support long-term sponsored engineering and science projects in which teams of Harvey Mudd College students collaborate with teams of students from partnering schools in Central and South America, Asia and Europe.

The Global Clinic Program incorporates intensive language instruction and immersion in the culture of the region during an extended visit to the partner school. During a one-month visit to each partner school, the student teams work on developing the project plan and collaborate with faculty advisors and company members of the team. HMC students and their international collaborators stay fully engaged during the academic year, participating in weekly video/audio conferences, collaborative presentations and design reviews at the sponsors’ facilities.

http://www.hmc.edu/academicsclinicresearch/internationalopportunities/globalclinicprogram.html

I want to get into a ranked university

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Every student I know (almost everyone!) I know wants to gain admission to a ranked university in the US. Students with high GMAT or GRE scores and students with low GMAT or GRE scores – everyone (really!) wants to get admission to a "good" university or a "ranked" university – preferably in the Top 50, most students say to me. One of the reasons these universities and colleges are ranked among the best in the world is because they are HIGHLY selective. If you have low test scores, the chances of you getting admission to a highly ranked university is pretty slim. In fact, even if you have high test scores, there is no guarantee that you will get admission into a top ranked university. In some cases, the rejection rate is 75% or higher. In other words, only 1 out of every 4 applicants may get in!

This does not mean the end of the world. This does not mean that universities that are not on the "ranked" list are bad or that you won't get a good education if you attend a university that is "non-ranked." Some very fine universities and colleges do not appear on the ranked list for reasons that have nothing to do with quality. While ranked universities are renowned for their quality, the opposite is not true. In other words, simply because a university does not appear on the ranked list, does not mean it is a bad university. 

Advice: Aim high but be realistic. Otherwise, you will set yourself up for disappointment