Category Archives: Synergy

Uma Gupta says Diversity has become the D-word

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Today, unfortunately, diversity has become the D-word. Many equate Diversity with Being Politically Correct. Which manager or employee is going to stand up and say, “I am sick of all this diversity nonsense?” without being shot down barely before the words are uttered. Can you imagine the fate of a manger who expresses such an opinion? So people listen to diversity lectures with glazed eyes and bored expressions, while secretly thinking, “This is all nonsense!” So, diversity is not about achieving certain percentages of “color” in your organization; it is not about lectures, workshops, and more lectures and workshops, says Uma Gupta. The first step toward diversity is giving people “safe forums” to express their opinions and perspectives and then findings ways to work through them and achieve a higher level of understanding.

Uma Gupta writes about entry-level technical talent

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Uma Gupta’s views on how best was recently published in the prestigious CIO.com magazine. Uma Gupta writes”

To find talent, you must create, invest in and nurture it; you must be willing to assume the risk that the talent you grow and nurture may sometimes benefit others, even your competitors. Still, companies that take a broader view of talent acquisition benefit in the long run. It is a law of nature: The more you give, the more you receive. The idea that the primary function of hiring managers is simply one of matchmaking—that is, finding the right person for the right job—is antiquated. Instead, forward-looking companies understand that talent acquisition also entails participating in the development of talent, particularly for entry-level positions.

Uma Gupta has consulted for Fortune 100 firms and her advice is the same. If you are not innovative in how you hire, how can you expect to be an innovative company? Innovation starts and ends with the talent you hire and hence Uma says be mindful of how you hire. Even more important, Uma says is what you do to attract innovation at the entry level.

Uma Gupta’s full article can be viewed at: http://www.cio.com/article/154051/_Tips_for_Recruiting_Entry_Level_Technical_Talent

Uma Gupta can be reached at (585) 489-4606 or at guptaguma@gmail.com

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Recruiting entry-level technical talent

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To find talent, you must invest in the seeds of talent; you must create and nurture talent; you must be willing to assume the risk that the talent you grow and nurture may sometimes benefit others, even your competitors. Still, companies that take a broader view of talent acquisition benefit in the long run. It is the law of nature: the more you give, the more you receive! The idea that the primary function of hiring managers is simply one of match-making, i.e., find the right person for the right job, is antiquated. Instead, forward-looking companies understand that talent acquisition also entails participating in the development of such talent, particularly for entry-level positions. Such companies play an active role in defining, creating, shaping, and nurturing talent. Progressive companies understand that the paying close attention to how talent is developed and grown is itself a rewarding experience, one that is mutually beneficial both to institutions of higher learning and to corporate America. This is particularly true for entry level positions. In a recent article submission to CIO, Dr. Gupta identifies ten easy steps to recruit entry-level technical talent. For more information on this article, please contact Dr. Gupta at guptaguma@gmail.com

No Talent Shortage, just Talent Recognition Shortage

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No Talent Shortage,
Just Talent Recognition Shortage

Dr. Uma G. Gupta
Article published in CIO

The little known truth in corporate America is that there is no talent shortage, just a severe shortage of people and systems that recognize, recruit, and retain talent. Hiring managers have been told repeatedly that there is a talent shortage across all industries. Many HR departments have convinced hiring managers that finding a qualified candidate is mission impossible and that hiring managers should lower their expectations. Often, finding a qualified candidate turns out to be a long-drawn process at the end of which many hiring managers get less than what than deserve and pay more than what they would like. Sounds familiar? If you are like most hiring managers, you have bought into the storyline of a severe talent shortage. It is time to challenge this widely accepted belief.

We live in times of sweeping and rapid global change. We work in a global marketplace that is driven by the most powerful and meaningful currency of our times, namely innovation. Corporate wealth and growth is no longer driven by mega size, assets, or past laurels. Instead, it is driven by the ability to innovate, innovate, and innovate. Innovation, in turn, creates new dynamics human resources. Innovation rapidly shifts resource expectations and needs often in unanticipated and unplanned ways. Innovation has an exponential dominoes impact on the talent requirements of organizations all over the world. In such a climate, talent requirements are in a constant state of flux. Yesterday’s talent requirements and hiring practices cannot meet today’s needs. The ability to recognize and respond to global shifts is the key to locating the talent your organization needs. While there is a great deal of press about current and impending talent shortage, what often remains unspoken is the tremendous shortage of people and systems that recognize and recruit human talent.

Corporate America is missing out on some of the most creative and experienced talent because its hiring practices, policies, organizational thinking and yes, HR systems are slow, parochial, outdated, and frankly are sometimes obstacles to talent acquisition. Ask the innovative, dynamic, and agile companies that easily attract the most creative talent about the secrets of their success. Successful companies don’t suffer with severe myopia that appears to plague many corporations.

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Energy Sector Faces Labor Shortage

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Uma_gupta06Many people still visualize “overalls and grease” when they think of the energy sector. In fact, this is diametrically opposite of the many cutting-edge fast-paced global projects and careers in energy. Changing perceptions is not easy. Many energy companies are struggling to educate students, parents, guidance counselors, and experienced professionals about the cutting technologies and talented people. The energy sector is no longer the volatile industry of the 80s. Today, it is dynamic, forward-thinking, global, and inter-disciplinary. It urgently needs research scientists, engineers, physicists, geologists, and information technology specialists, to name a few. Large retirements are expected even as the industry sees a steady decline in the number of students pursuing degrees relevant to energy. Without experienced talent, the energy sector simply cannot achieve its full potential. Cost overruns, project delays, safety accidents, economic loss, decline in exciting discoveries, and loss in our global ranking are inevitable, unless and until leaders address this problem head on. What is needed is a comprehensive industry-wide talent acquisition strategy.

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You are What!?* An Engineer!

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Uma_gupta06Ask a middle or high school kid his or her choice of a career and there is a one in ten chance the kid will choose engineering! When my institution has hosted Bring Your Children to Work Day and I ask kids to name the top five careers of choice, rarely is engineering mentioned. Particularly in rural areas the top choices are nurse, firemen, teacher, and police officer. We need all the above professions to grow and thrive. However, the fact that our kids often have limited knowledge about career choices should be of grave concern to corporate America. What can we do to get our children to select science and engineering professions?

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Alfred State College President to Lead New Technology, Math and Science for SUNY [Press Release]

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For Immediate Release: June 14, 2006

Albany – SUNY Chancellor John R. Ryan announced today that Alfred State College President Dr. Uma Gupta has accepted his invitation to lead a SUNY-wide initiative to increase the number of women and minorities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines across the
university.  She will resign her position as President of Alfred State College effective June 30, 2006 in order to lead this important initiative.

"The University appreciates President Gupta’s strong leadership and great efforts at Alfred State College," said Chancellor Ryan. "The challenge of making science and mathematics more accessible to under-represented groups is an important issue for SUNY and the State of New York. Dr. Gupta is well-qualified to take on that challenge."

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