Monthly Archives: December 2007

Uma Gupta writes about why edginess can be good

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Topdog_3 Uma Gupta has been writing about the importance of shifting perspectives if we are to live creative lives. There are five dimensions to shifting perspectives, writes Uma in her upcoming book.

  • Problems
  • Solutions
  • Ourselves
  • World
  • Assumptions

The most important and defining step is our ability to define the problem and to shift your perspectives about the problem; shift your perspective by going to the edge. In other words, edginess is an essential ingredient for the birth of creativity and innovation. But what is edginess? Edginess is the willingness and ability to discard all previous notions of your understanding about the problem, and going to the edges of the problem. At the edges, writes Uma Gupta, lies the boundaries of the problem and it is near the boundaries that you will find a more accurate description and "feel" for the problem. Edginess is not for the faint-hearted, and edginess is certainly not for those who are afraid.

PS: All material copyrighted for my upcoming book. Please contact me for details. Topdog_2

Uma Gupta writes: Be a Top Dog

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Topdog In her previous post, Uma Gupta wrote about the importance of shifting perspectives in order to be creative and innovative. Being the Top Dog is not easy. It requires taking risks and viewing the world from the edge.

Uma wrote about five dimensions on shifting perspectives for her upcoming book:

  • Problems
  • Solutions
  • Ourselves
  • World
  • Assumptions

Shifting perspectives on a problem that we are confronting is a huge challenge for most of us. The problems arrives at our door step in a certain shape, size, color, and dimension. Our training, both professional and social, immediately forces us to look at the problem in "a pre-determined way." We quickly assume that the problem facing us is one that we have confronted before. We assume that we know the right solution to the problem, writes Uma Gupta. Or, we "almost know" the solution to the problem and we simply have to pull the pieces together. Unfortunately, this is the first step toward closing tightly and firmly the door to creativity, innovative thinking, and ah! ha! moments. Writes Uma Gupta, "If each of us forced ourselves to say every time that we confront a problem that the problem is NOT what we think it is, we will experience incredible bursts of creative energy."

PS: All material copyrighted for an upcoming book. Please contact author for permission to reuse materials.

Uma Gupta writes:Shifting Our Perspectives on Our Problems

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In her previous post, Uma Gupta wrote about the importance of shifting perspectives in order to be creative and innovative. Uma wrote about five dimensions on shifting perspectives for her upcoming book:

  • Problems
  • Solutions
  • Ourselves
  • World
  • Assumptions

Shifting perspectives on a problem that we are confronting is a huge challenge for most of us. The problems arrives at our door step in a certain shape, size, color, and dimension. Our training, both professional and social, immediately forces us to look at the problem in "a pre-determined way." We quickly assume that the problem facing us is one that we have confronted before. We assume that we know the right solution to the problem, writes Uma Gupta. Or, we "almost know" the solution to the problem and we simply have to pull the pieces together. Unfortunately, this is the first step toward closing tightly and firmly the door to creativity, innovative thinking, and ah! ha! moments. Writes Uma Gupta, "If each of us forced ourselves to say every time that we confront a problem that the problem is NOT what we think it is, we will experience incredible bursts of creative energy."

PS: All material copyrighted for an upcoming book. Please contact author for permission to reuse materials.

Uma Gupta writes on Shifting Perspectives

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The best solutions to the most complex of problems arrive at our doorstep when we shift perspectives, writes Uma Gupta. Shifting perspective requires five different elements. Some or all of these elements may be in play at any given time, writes Uma Gupta.

  • Shifting perspective requires that we look at the problem in a whole different way.
  • Shifting perspective requires that we look at solutions in a whole different ways.
  • Shifting perspective requires that we look at ourselves in a whole different way.
  • Shifting perspective requires that we look at our assumptions in a whole different way.
  • Shifting perspective requires that we look at our world in a whole different way.

It is only when we shift our perspectives can we be creative and innovative. Out-of-the-box thinking is all about shifting perspectives. Women can shift perspectives easily when it is a "good problem." A good problem, writes Uma Gupta, is one that is not personal, does not affect her in a personal way. An example of a "good problem" may be, "How do we keep children safe in a crowded mall?" On the other hand, a "negative problem," writes Uma Gupta can get us in knots easily. A "negative problem," is when we are treated in an unfair, unjust manner; or when we face betrayal, or marginalized. To shift perspectives when we deal with negative problems requires tenacity, writes Uma Gupta, a skill that can be developer.

PS: This material is copyrighted as it is part of an upcoming book by Uma Gupta. Please contact me for permission to use this material.